Women's boxing: India

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Ulan-Ude: Former champion L Sarita Devi (60kg) was on Sunday knocked out of the World Women’s Boxing Championships after being upstaged by Russia’s Natalia Shadrina on a disappointing day for India. The fourth seed, who got a first-round bye, frittered away a strong start to bow out with a 0-5 loss. There was more disappointment for the country when in the last bout of the day, debutant Nandini (81kg) proved to be no match for Germany’s Irina-Nicoletta Schonberger and was out-punched 0-5. Sarita, a gold-medallist in the 2006 New Delhi edition of the showpiece, was chasing her maiden world medal in over a decade.
 
Ulan-Ude: Former champion L Sarita Devi (60kg) was on Sunday knocked out of the World Women’s Boxing Championships after being upstaged by Russia’s Natalia Shadrina on a disappointing day for India. The fourth seed, who got a first-round bye, frittered away a strong start to bow out with a 0-5 loss. There was more disappointment for the country when in the last bout of the day, debutant Nandini (81kg) proved to be no match for Germany’s Irina-Nicoletta Schonberger and was out-punched 0-5. Sarita, a gold-medallist in the 2006 New Delhi edition of the showpiece, was chasing her maiden world medal in over a decade.
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===Mary Kom, Manju, Jamuna, Lovlina assured medals===
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[https://epaper.timesgroup.com/olive/ODN/TimesOfIndia/shared/ShowArticle.aspx?doc=TOIDEL%2F2019%2F10%2F11&entity=Ar02707&sk=D2050EDA&mode=text  Sabi Hussain, MARY KOM SHOWS THE WAY, YOUNGSTERS FOLLOW, October 11, 2019: ''The Times of India'']
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''Four Indians In Boxing Worlds Semis, Ensure Rich Medal Haul''
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Indian boxing legend, MC Mary Kom, became the most successful boxer in the history of the World Championships – both men and women – after assuring herself of an astonishing eighth medal at the ongoing wpoen’s Worlds in Ulan Ude, Russia on Thursday. The 36-year-old defeated Rio Olympics bronze medallist, Columbia’s Valencia Victoria, by a unanimous 5-0 verdict in a 51kg category quarterfinal bout to become the first and only boxer to secure eight medals at the Worlds since the tounament’s inception in 1974. While the championships was first held as a men’s only event, the inaugural women’s event took place 25 years later, in 2001.
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Earlier, both Mary Kom and Cuba’s Felix Savon in the men’s event were tied as the most successful boxers at the Worlds with seven medals – six gold and a silver. Ireland’s Katie Taylor was the other most successful boxer at the women’s Worlds with six medals – five gold and a bronze. For the record, Mary Kom’s earlier medals came in the pinweight (46kg) and light-flyweight (48kg) category and this will be her first medal in the newly-introduced 51kg (flyweight) division, which is an Olympic category.
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Later, Manju Rani, Jamuna Boro and Lovlina Borgohain, added to the cheer by assuring themselves of a medal each by advancing to the semifinals in their respective weight divisions to cap off a sensational day for India. Manju (48kg) made her maiden Worlds appearance special after stunning top seed and last edition’s bronzemedallist Kim Hyang Mi of North Korea 4-1. Another debutant, Jamuna (54kg) won against Germany’s Ursula Gottlob by a similar margin.
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In the final bout of the day featuring an Indian, Lovlina played smartly and waited for her moments to land some effective punches on Poland’s Karolina Koszewska to win 4-1 to ensure herself a second Worlds medal, having securing a bronze in the last edition. All four Indians will be in action in the semis on Saturday.
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Two-time bronze medallist, Kavita Chahal’s (+81kg) journey ended following her 0-5 defeat to Belarus’ Katsiaryna Kavaleva in the quarters.
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For Mary Kom, who is aiming her seventh Worlds gold, reigning European Championship and European Games gold-medallist, Turkey’s Busenaz Cakiroglu, will present a tough challenge in the semis. This will be third-seeded Mary Kom’s first meeting against Cakiroglu, who is seeded second. A win against Cakiroglu will assure the Indian a direct entry into the first 2020 Olympic qualifier in Wuhan, China (Feb 3 to 14) without facing selection trials at home.
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“I am happy with the achievement. It’s an amazing feeling (to become the highest number of medal winner at the Worlds). I would like to thank the people of my country for their continued love and support. The job is yet not finished for me. I will try and get a higher medal. I am feeling confident about my next fight. I have not faced her (Cakiroglu) earlier, but know her style of play. I am training accordingly,” Mary Kom told TOI from Ulan Ude.
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Besides six world titles, Mary Kom’s illustrious career boasts of an Olympic bronze (London 2012), five Asian titles and gold medals at the CWG and Asian Games. This year alone, Mary Kom won gold at the India Open in Guwahati and President’s Cup in Indonesia.
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Explaining her quarterfinal bout against Victoria, Mary Kom’s personal coach, Chhote Lal Yadav, told TOI that his ward fought a tactically and technically superior fight, focussing mainly on her speed. “Mary competed against her for the first time, so it was tricky. We had prepared well against her, knowing she is quick on her feet. We had watched her videos and told Mary to maintain speed throughout the bout. Mary waited for her chances and defended in a fine manner.”

Revision as of 18:39, 12 October 2019

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Contents

2019

World Women’s Championships

Disappointing day for India

Sarita bows out of boxing Worlds

Ulan-Ude: Former champion L Sarita Devi (60kg) was on Sunday knocked out of the World Women’s Boxing Championships after being upstaged by Russia’s Natalia Shadrina on a disappointing day for India. The fourth seed, who got a first-round bye, frittered away a strong start to bow out with a 0-5 loss. There was more disappointment for the country when in the last bout of the day, debutant Nandini (81kg) proved to be no match for Germany’s Irina-Nicoletta Schonberger and was out-punched 0-5. Sarita, a gold-medallist in the 2006 New Delhi edition of the showpiece, was chasing her maiden world medal in over a decade.

Mary Kom, Manju, Jamuna, Lovlina assured medals

Sabi Hussain, MARY KOM SHOWS THE WAY, YOUNGSTERS FOLLOW, October 11, 2019: The Times of India


Four Indians In Boxing Worlds Semis, Ensure Rich Medal Haul

Indian boxing legend, MC Mary Kom, became the most successful boxer in the history of the World Championships – both men and women – after assuring herself of an astonishing eighth medal at the ongoing wpoen’s Worlds in Ulan Ude, Russia on Thursday. The 36-year-old defeated Rio Olympics bronze medallist, Columbia’s Valencia Victoria, by a unanimous 5-0 verdict in a 51kg category quarterfinal bout to become the first and only boxer to secure eight medals at the Worlds since the tounament’s inception in 1974. While the championships was first held as a men’s only event, the inaugural women’s event took place 25 years later, in 2001.

Earlier, both Mary Kom and Cuba’s Felix Savon in the men’s event were tied as the most successful boxers at the Worlds with seven medals – six gold and a silver. Ireland’s Katie Taylor was the other most successful boxer at the women’s Worlds with six medals – five gold and a bronze. For the record, Mary Kom’s earlier medals came in the pinweight (46kg) and light-flyweight (48kg) category and this will be her first medal in the newly-introduced 51kg (flyweight) division, which is an Olympic category.

Later, Manju Rani, Jamuna Boro and Lovlina Borgohain, added to the cheer by assuring themselves of a medal each by advancing to the semifinals in their respective weight divisions to cap off a sensational day for India. Manju (48kg) made her maiden Worlds appearance special after stunning top seed and last edition’s bronzemedallist Kim Hyang Mi of North Korea 4-1. Another debutant, Jamuna (54kg) won against Germany’s Ursula Gottlob by a similar margin.

In the final bout of the day featuring an Indian, Lovlina played smartly and waited for her moments to land some effective punches on Poland’s Karolina Koszewska to win 4-1 to ensure herself a second Worlds medal, having securing a bronze in the last edition. All four Indians will be in action in the semis on Saturday.

Two-time bronze medallist, Kavita Chahal’s (+81kg) journey ended following her 0-5 defeat to Belarus’ Katsiaryna Kavaleva in the quarters.

For Mary Kom, who is aiming her seventh Worlds gold, reigning European Championship and European Games gold-medallist, Turkey’s Busenaz Cakiroglu, will present a tough challenge in the semis. This will be third-seeded Mary Kom’s first meeting against Cakiroglu, who is seeded second. A win against Cakiroglu will assure the Indian a direct entry into the first 2020 Olympic qualifier in Wuhan, China (Feb 3 to 14) without facing selection trials at home.

“I am happy with the achievement. It’s an amazing feeling (to become the highest number of medal winner at the Worlds). I would like to thank the people of my country for their continued love and support. The job is yet not finished for me. I will try and get a higher medal. I am feeling confident about my next fight. I have not faced her (Cakiroglu) earlier, but know her style of play. I am training accordingly,” Mary Kom told TOI from Ulan Ude.

Besides six world titles, Mary Kom’s illustrious career boasts of an Olympic bronze (London 2012), five Asian titles and gold medals at the CWG and Asian Games. This year alone, Mary Kom won gold at the India Open in Guwahati and President’s Cup in Indonesia.

Explaining her quarterfinal bout against Victoria, Mary Kom’s personal coach, Chhote Lal Yadav, told TOI that his ward fought a tactically and technically superior fight, focussing mainly on her speed. “Mary competed against her for the first time, so it was tricky. We had prepared well against her, knowing she is quick on her feet. We had watched her videos and told Mary to maintain speed throughout the bout. Mary waited for her chances and defended in a fine manner.”

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