Ahar, Udaipur

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This article has been extracted from

THE IMPERIAL GAZETTEER OF INDIA , 1908.

OXFORD, AT THE CLARENDON PRESS.

Note: National, provincial and district boundaries have changed considerably since 1908. Typically, old states, ‘divisions’ and districts have been broken into smaller units, units, and many tahsils upgraded to districts.Many units have since been renamed. Therefore, this article is being posted mainly for its historical value.

Ahar, Udaipur

Village in the State of Udaipur, Rajputana, situated in 24 degree 35' N. and 73 degree 44' E., on the banks of a stream of the same name about two miles east of Udaipur city. Population (1901), 982. The village contains a small mission school attended by 35 pupils, but is chiefly noteworthy as possessing the Mahasati or group of cenotaphs of the chiefs of Mewar since they left Chitor. That of Rana Amar Singh II is the most conspicuous, but almost all are elegant structures. To the east are the remains of an ancient city which, according to tradition, was founded by Asaditya on the site of a still more ancient place, Tambavati Nagri, where dwelt the Tonwar ancestors of Vikramaditya before he obtained Ujjain.

The name was changed first to Anandpur and afterwards to Ahar. The ruins are known as Dhul Kot (' the fort of ashes '), and four inscriptions of the tenth century and a number of coins have been discovered in them. Some ancient Jain temples are still to be traced ; also the remains of an old Hindu temple, the outside of which still shows excellent carving.

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