Commonwealth Games 2018 and India

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Contents

The South Asian medals tally

 

#

Country

Gold medals

Silver medals

Bronze medals

Total

1

Australia

80

59

59

198

2

England

45

45

46

136

3

India

26

20

20

66

24

Pakistan

1

0

4

5

30

Bangladesh

0

2

0

2

31

Sri Lanka

0

1

5

6

 

Bangladesh’s medals

The sport

Gold medals

Silver medals

Bronze medals

Total

Shooting

0

2

0

2

 

India’s medals

The sport

Gold medals

Silver medals

Bronze medals

Total

Athletics

1

1

1

3

Badminton

2

3

1

6

Boxing

3

3

3

9

Shooting

7

4

5

16

Squash

0

2

0

2

Table Tennis

3

2

3

8

Weightlifting

5

2

3

10

Wrestling

5

3

4

12

 

Pakistan’s medals

The sport

Gold medals

Silver medals

Bronze medals

Total

Weightlifting

0

0

2

2

Wrestling

1

0

2

3

 

Sri Lanka’s medals

The sport

Gold medals

Silver medals

Bronze medals

Total

Boxing

0

0

3

3

Weightlifting

0

1

2

3

 

South Asian medals won: by gender

Rank

Nations

Gold Medal

Silver Medal

Bronze Medal

Total Medals

Rank
by
Total

M

W

X

T

M

W

X

T

M

W

X

T

M

W

X

T

3

India

13

12

1

26

9

10

1

20

13

6

1

20

35

28

3

66

4

24

Pakistan

1

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

4

0

0

4

5

0

0

5

18

30

Bangladesh

0

0

0

0

2

0

0

2

0

0

0

0

2

0

0

2

26

31

Sri Lanka

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

1

3

2

0

5

4

2

0

6

16

 

Legend

M: Men

 

W: Women

 

X: Mixed

 

T: Total

 

 

India's medal winners (name, medal, event)

 

ATHLETICS

(Gold 1 | Silver 1 | Bronze 1)

Name

Medal

Event

Neeraj Chopra

Gold

Men's Javelin Throw

Seema Punia

Silver

Women's Discus Throw

Navjeet Dhillon

Bronze

Women's Discus Throw

BADMINTON

(Gold 2 | Silver 3| Bronze 1)

Name

Medal

Event

India

Gold

Mixed Team

Saina Nehwal

Gold

Women's Singles

Kidambi Srikanth

Silver

Men's Singles

PV Sindhu

Silver

Women's Singles

Satwik Rankireddy /Chirag Shetty

Silver

Men's Doubles

Satwik Rankireddy /Ashwini Ponnappa

Bronze

Women's Doubles

BOXING

(Gold 3 | Silver 3 | Bronze 3)

Name

Medal

Event

MC Mary Kom

Gold

Women's 45-48kg

Vikas Krishan

Gold

Men's 75kg

Gaurav Solanki

Gold

Men's 52kg

Amit

Silver

Men's 46-49kg

Satish Kumar

Silver

Men's +91kg

Manish Kaushik

Silver

Men's 60kg

Manoj Kumar

Bronze

Men's 69kg

Naman Tanwar

Bronze

Men's 91kg

Mohammed

Bronze

Men's 56kg

PARA POWERLIFTING

(BRONZE 1)

 

 

Name

Medal

Event

Sachin Chaudhary

Bronze

Men's Heavyweight

 

SHOOTING

(GOLD 7 | SILVER 4| BRONZE 5)

Name

Medal

Event

Heena Sindhu

Gold

Women's 25m Pistol

Manu Bhaker

Gold

Women's 10m Air Pistol

Sanjeev Rajput

Gold

Men's 50m Rifle 3 Positions

Jitu Rai

Gold

Men's 10m Air Pistol

Anish

Gold

Men's 25m Rapid Fire Pistol

Shreyasi Singh

Gold

Women's Double Trap

Tejaswini Sawant

Gold

Women's 50m Rifle 3 Positions

Anjum Moudgil

Silver

Women's 50m Rifle 3 Positions

Heena Sindhu

Silver

Women's 10m Air Pistol

Mehuli Ghosh

Silver

Women's 10m Air Rifle

Tejaswini Sawant

Silver

Women's 50m Rifle Prone

Apurvi Chandela

Bronze

Women's 10m Air Rifle

Om Mitharval

Bronze

Men's 10m Air Pistol

Ravi Kumar

Bronze

Men's 10m Air Rifle

Om Mitharval

Bronze

Men's 50m Pistol

Ankur Mittal

Bronze

Men's Double Trap

SQUASH

(SILVER 2)

 

Name

Medal

Event

Dipika Pallikal/Saurav Ghosal

Silver

Mixed Doubles

Joshna Chinappa/ Dipika Pallikal Karthik

Silver

Women's Doubles

 

 

TABLE TENNIS

(Gold 3 | Silver 2 | Bronze 3)

Name

Medal

Event

India

Gold

Men's Team

India

Gold

Women's Team

Manika Batra

Gold

Women's Singles

Manika Batra/Mouma Das

Silver

Women's Doubles

Achanta Sharath/Sathiyan Gnanasekaran

Silver

Men's Doubles

Sathiyan Gnanasekaran/Manika Batra

Bronze

Mixed Doubles

Harmeet Desai/Sanil Shetty

Bronze

Men's Doubles

Achanta Sharath

Bronze

Men's Singles


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WEIGHTLIFTING

(Gold 5 | Silver 2 | Bronze 2)

Name

Medal

Event

Saikhom Mirabai Chanu

Gold

Women's 48kg

Khumukcham Sanjita Chanu

Gold

Women's 53kg

Venkat Rahul Ragala

Gold

Men's 85kg

Sathish Kumar Sivalingam

Gold

Men's 77kg

Punam Yadav

Gold

Women's 69kg

Gururaja

Silver

Men's 56kg

Pardeep Singh

Silver

Men's 105kg

Deepak Lather

Bronze

Men's 69kg

Vikas Thakur

Bronze

Men's 94kg

 

WRESTLING

(Gold 5 | Silver 3 | Bronze 4)

Name

Medal

Event

Sushil Kumar

Gold

Men's Freestyle 74kg

Vinesh Phogat

Gold

Women's Freestyle 50kg

Rahul Aware

Gold

Men's Freestyle 57kg

Bajrang Punia

Gold

Men's Freestyle 65kg

Sumit

Gold

Men's Freestyle 125kg

Pooja Dhanda

Silver

Women's Freestyle 57kg

Mausam Khatri

Silver

Men's Freestyle 97kg

Babita Kumari

Silver

Women's Freestyle 53kg

Kiran

Bronze

Women's Freestyle 76kg

Sakshi Malik

Bronze

Women's Freestyle 62kg

Somveer

Bronze

Men's Freestyle 86kg

Divya Kakran

Bronze

Women's Freestyle 68kg

 

India’s performance at CWG 2018/ Analyses

India’s 3rd best CWG; India was no.3 country

The 2018 CWG was India’s 3rd best in terms of medals won;
India was the no.3 country in terms of medals won at the Commonwealth Games, 2018
From: Priya Kapoor, April 20, 2018: The Times of India

See graphic:

The 2018 CWG was India’s 3rd best in terms of medals won;
India was the no.3 country in terms of medals won at the Commonwealth Games, 2018

State-wise performance

The Commonwealth Games, 2018- the number of medals won by athletes from individual Indian states
From: Priya Kapoor, April 20, 2018: The Times of India

See graphic:

The Commonwealth Games, 2018- the number of medals won by athletes from individual Indian states

A New breed of heroes

Biju BabuCyriac, While Hockey Teams Returned Empty Handed, The Likes Of Manika Batra & Neeraj Chopra Led From The Front, April 17, 2018: The Times of India


Gold Coast: The XXI Commonwealth Games was an aberration for India in the sense that the hockey players, both men and women, returned empty handed after having promised so much. With the spotlight away from them, the focus shifted to the likes of paddler Manika Batra from Delhi, javelin thrower Neeraj Chopra from Haryana and weightlifter Mirabai Chanu, who all led from the front to ensure that India’s national anthem was played 26 times, across seven venues, from the Belmont Shooting range in Brisbane to the Oxenford studios which hosted table tennis, squash and boxing.

The rarity of his achievement ensures that the ‘best Indian male athlete award’ of the Games should go to javelin throw champion Neeraj Chopra. On his way to gold, Chopra silenced the home crowd, which was rooting for veteran Australian Hamish Peacock. Competing in the hostile, packed cauldron of the Carrara Stadium would have been a tough initiation for Chopra, who proved he was made of sterner stuff, coming up with a series of massive throws that took the gold away from the hosts.

The same honour in the women’s section should go to another youngster table tennis champion, Manika Batra. No one, not even her teammates, expected such a stunning show from the 22-year-old but the Delhi girl was in her own zone, beating higher-ranked rivals from Singapore twice during the course of the Games.

Seema Punia was expected to win the silver and she did just that, but no one thought Jinson Johnson would trouble the Africans in the men’s 1500m final. Johnson ran the race of his life to better the national record set by Bahadur Prasad way back in 1995. “For me, this was the best I could manage but for many others in the field, including world and Olympic medallists, it was a winning race. So they just had to alter the pace according to the competition whereas I had to give my personal best to be with them,” Johnson said.

Punia, ever a companion of controversy — the latest was her trip to Russia to train ahead of the Games — asked why the media should be concerned with her training venues. “I gave you the medal, what more you want,” she countered. Shuttlers Saina Nehwal and Srikanth Kidambi are already world beaters and so their role in India winning the team medal was more less expected, though Srikanth, the new world No. 1, failed to assert his supremacy in the singles final.

In boxing, Mary Kom had little challenge and this was one of her easiest climbs to the top of the podium. Vikas Krishan, who was at pains to explain his pressure to win, added one more medal that will now sit alongside his Asian Games gold, a rare combo. India’s young shooters stole the limelight, setting the range on fire, but few veterans stood their ground and took the gold. Heena Sidhu, after losing to Manu Bhaker in the 10m, took the 25m gold while Tejaswini, the 2010 World Champion, won a gold and a silver.

The weightlifters won a bag full of medals but the tone for the golden run was set by Mirabai Chanu, who set a new Games record in women’s 48kg. The celebrated wrestlers were not to be left behind and powered by Sushil Kumar and Vinesh Phogat they collected a total of 12 medals, including five gold.

The athletes who led India’s charge

April 4, 2018: The Times of India


ATHLETICS

NEERAJ CHOPRA (JAVELIN THROW)

In athletics, 20-year-old javelin thrower Neeraj Chopra would be India’s top gold medal prospect despite the presence of several track and field veterans in the contingent. Chopra, who caught the nation’s attention with a sensational gold in the U-20 world championships in 2016 with a junior world record effort, has it in him to claim the top spot in the CWG. Though his personal best is 86.48m, a throw similar to his season best of 85.94m — achieved in Patiala last month — should be enough to clinch top honours in Gold Coast. In Glasgow CWG, four years back, Julius Yego of Kenyta had claimed the javelin gold with 83.87m.

BOXING

VIKAS KRISHAN (MEN’S 75 KG)

The charismatic Vikas Krishan shot into limelight, winning gold at the 2010 Asian Games in Guangzhou. Ever since, it’s been a bit of a rollercoaster ride for the boxer from Haryana. He won bronze at the 2014 Incheon Asiad in the 75kg category. The 26-year-old is back in form, winning the best boxer award at the Strandja Memorial in Bulgaria recently. He claimed gold in the competition, overcoming World Championship bronze-medallist Troy Isley, and is fancied to lead India’s charge.

MANOJ KUMAR (MEN’S 69 KG)

At 31, Manoj is a vastly experienced campaigner. He will try to rekindle the highs of 2010 CWG in New Delhi where he triumphed with frenzied spectators in the boxing arena bringing down the house. In the 2014 Glasgow Games, Manoj was knocked out in the quarterfinals. The Arjuna awardee had to stay satisfied with a bronze medal at the recently concluded India Open International tournament in the capital.

LAISHRAM SARITA DEVI (WOMEN’S 60 KG)

Along with the illustrious MC Mary Kom, L Sarita Devi has been a torch-bearer for women’s boxing in the country. However, despite her numerous achievements, including gold at the 2006 World Championships and silver at the 2014 Glasgow Commonwealth Games, the weight of the 2014 Asiad controversy hangs heavy on her shoulders. She was extremely disappointed after the judges ruled that her opponent Park Ji-Na of Korea had beaten her in the semifinal. The Indian felt cheated and at the medal awarding ceremony, a tearful Devi refused to accept her bronze and was banned by the world body for a year.

BADMINTON

PV SINDHU

Olympic silver medallist PV Sindhu is the favourite to win the women’s singles gold. The 22-year-old, who had won bronze in 2014, will look to make amends. In Glasgow too, Sindhu was expected to win gold but was shocked by Canada’s Michelle Li in the semifinals. In the last four years since, Sindhu has achieved a lot, winning many titles and also becoming the world No. 2. Though she suffered a minor injury last week, Sindhu returned to court on Sunday and looked completely fit. With no big shuttler apart from her illustrious senior Saina Nehwal in the fray, Sindhu knows that she needs to beat the former world No.1 to finish on top.

SAINA NEHWAL

Saina Nehwal’s career started with the 2006 Commonwealth Games, when the then Indian coach Vimal Kumar preferred her ahead of Aparna Popat. Saina did not look back after that. Interestingly, her 2010 women’s singles gold at the New Delhi CWG catapulted her to international glory. She won close to 20 international titles after that. At 28, Saina is looking to extend her career with another superlative performance at the CWG. It’s clear that the only challenger to Saina is Sindhu. The lastminute injury scare to Sindhu has put more responsibility on Saina’s shoulders as coach Pullela Gopichand may prefer her for the team event which is scheduled to begin on April 5.

KIDAMBI SRIKANTH

World No. 2 Kidambi Srikanth was on a roll in 2017, winning four Super Series titles and was within striking distance of becoming No. 1. Srikanth, who won a bronze at the 2014 Games, needs to work hard to win gold now. Malaysian legend and former world No. 1 Lee Chong Wei and HS Prannoy are in Srikanth’s path to glory. Beating Chong Wei is not easy and Prannoy is always a tough nut to crack. Unless another shuttler produces a major upset, which appears highly unlikely, these three shuttlers are strong favourites to win gold in men’s singles

SQUASH

DIPIKA- JOSHANA

Four years ago in Glasgow, the duo of Dipika Pallikal Karthik and Joshana Chinappa created history by winning the country’s first-ever gold medal in squash. Four years on, it’s rather telling that the dream of another medal rests once again on these two tried-and-tested veterans of the game.

Seeded third among women’s doubles, Dipika and Joshana are placed in Pool C along with Wales, Pakistan and Malta. With the top two teams making it to the main round, Dipika and Joshana are expected to have it easy. The real challenge that awaits them is in the knockout stages where they will have to fight it out against top-ranked players from Australia, England and New Zealand. Although it won’t be a cakewalk for the two at Gold Coast, Dipika and Joshana offer the best chance for a medal in squash.

SHOOTING

JITU RAI (50M PISTOL AND 10M AIR PISTOL):

Only an empty pistol can keep Jitu Rai away from the podium finish as the army shooter will probably face the weakest field in the 50m pistol event ever since he began shooting. The only competition Jitu will face, in both, 50m and 10m air pistol events, would be from compatriot Om Mitharwal. With the young Mitharwal in fray, India can hope for a 1-2 finish on podium.

Considering Jitu’s bronze finish in the World Cup in Guadalajara last month, Jitu is expected win gold in both the pistol events. While he had finished 10th in 10m air pistol at Glasgow, Jitu will be defending his 50m pistol title.

APURVI CHANDELA (10M AIR RIFLE)

The heart-breaking 34th place finish at the Rio Games two years ago had taken a toll on Apurvi Chandela. The Jaipur shooter then looked like a shadow of her former self. But the shooter is back in medal contention with a silver finish in the Nationals in December last year. Although she didn’t win a medal in the Guadalajara World Cup, she made it to the final with a decent score of 626.8. In Gold Coast, Apurvi will be defending the 10m air rifle gold that she had won in the Glasgow. She will get a tough fight from young Indian Mehuli Ghosh.

MEHULI GHOSH (10M AIR RIFLE)

Mehuli Ghosh, 18, is not an unknown name anymore. The West Bengal shooter, who had won eight gold and three bronze medals at the Nationals, made her senior World Cup debut special by winning bronze in the women’s 10m air rifle event in Guadalajara last month. There are high chances of Mehuli winning her first Commonwealth Games medal. With a small field of only 18 shooters, Mehuli will be one of the favourites to win gold.

MANU BHAKER (10M AIR PISTOL)

Considering her current form, Manu Bhaker, 16, is safely India’s best bet to win gold in Gold Coast.

Other than sweeping the senior (above 21), junior (U-21) and youth (U-18) National titles in December last year, the Haryana girl has won four World Cup gold medals (2 senior, 2 junior), including a Junior world record on debut last month. Though Manu shoots in 10m air pistol and 25m pistol events, she will be competing only in the 10m event at Gold Coast. And like many other Indian shooters, her biggest challenge would also come from an Indian — Heena Sidhu in her case. This will be Manu’s first Commonwealth Games.

ANKUR MITTAL (DOUBLE TRAP)

The former World No. 1 double trapper will shoot in his second CWG. Mittal, who had finished fourth in Glasgow, will probably face the toughest field, compared to his Indian teammates. The Delhi-based shooter will probably shoot in the Olympicdiscarded event, double trap, for the last time as he plans to switch to trap. The Indian will be challenged by defending champion and Rio Olympics bronze medallist Steven Scott of England.

GYMNASTICS

ARUNA BUDDA REDDY

Aruna Budda Reddy will love to be back in Australia. Just over a month back, she created history by becoming the first Indian gymnast to clinch an individual medal at the Gymnastics World Cup in Melbourne. This week, the 22-year-old will be carrying hopes of medal in Gold Coast. A black belt holder, Aruna’s father Narayan Reddy was instrumental in shifting her to gymnastics at the age of eight. She won her first National medal in 2005. It has been a steady progress for the Hyderabad girl. After that she participated in World Championships in 2013, 2014 and 2017 in Antwerp, Nanning and Montreal respectively. However, she failed to progress beyond the qualifying rounds.

HOCKEY

MEN’S TEAM

When Sjoerd Marijne took over as the coach of the Indian men’s hockey team, one of his first mission statements was for the Commonwealth Games. It said — target gold. On April 7, when Manpreet Singh and his men take on Pakistan in their opener, it will be a definitive step in the direction. The fact that the 18 players in Gold Coast haven’t played together as a unit in any major event – with Vishnu Prasad in the midfield and Dilpreet Singh in the forward line being raw talent – could be a drawback. The conversion rate of the forwardline continues to be a cause of concern. That said, the two-time silver medalists have worked hard over the past year and most of them are at their peak in terms of form, fitness and confidence. The team should be weary of losing to lower-ranked teams.

WOMEN’S TEAM

Women’s chief coach Harendra Singh has struck a fine balance of experience and young talent. With an eye on the podium —which they last climbed as champions at the 2002 Manchester Games— the team management has stretched itself to make this team a competitive unit. While they still lack speed, they are not found wanting on skills or fitness. Their campaign will primarily depend on their ability to handle pressure, execution of plans and penalty corner conversions. The experience of Savita in the cage and skipper Rani in the frontline will form the crux of India’s campaign. It is also a good opportunity for some of the senior players to erase the scares of having finished last at the 2016 Rio Olympics.

WRESTLING

VINESH PHOGAT

It was heartbreaking for Vinesh Phogat in Rio Olympics, when her run ended in tears due to injury in the quarterfinal. She was one of the sure-shot medallists for the country, but injured her knee during her match against China’s Sun Yanan. She had to be stretchered off from the mat. That memory still haunts Vinesh and according to the champion wrestler only a gold at the Gold Coast Commonwealth Games would prove as a balm. She is the defending CWG champion, having won the gold in 2014, and stands a good chance of repeating that feat. Her recent form is good – she won silver in the 2017 and 2018 Asian Wrestling Championship. Vinesh will be participating in the 50kg freestyle category.

SAKSHI MALIK

After her bronze medal-winning feat in Rio, Sakshi has become a doyen of Indian wrestling. Post her Olympic medal, Sakshi was awarded the Rajiv Khel Ratna Award and the Padma Shri. She would love to convert her 2014 CWG silver medal into gold this time. Her Olympic bronze came in the 58kg weight category. Sakshi moved up to the 62kg weight class last year. This transition was well-planned. First, she moved to the 60kg weight class and won silver at the 2017 Asian Wrestling Championship in New Delhi. Then at the Commonwealth Wrestling Championship in Johannesburg she won gold in the 62 kg weight category. Recently, she won gold in the same weight class at the 2018 Asian Wrestling Championship in Kyrgyzstan.

BAJRANG PUNIA

Bajrang Punia is India’s best bet in men’s freestyle wrestling in Gold Coast. He will participate in the 65kg weight class. In the last two years, Bajrang has emerged from the shadows of his mentor Yogeshwar Dutt and has held his own. After Yogeshwar’s failure in Rio Olympics, Bajrang assumed the role of the lead wrestler in the 65kg weight category. As Yogeshwar took a sabbatical from the mat, Bajrang won the country medals at the World, Asian and Commonwealth level. He bagged silver in the 2017 World U-23 Wrestling Championships, gold at the 2017 Commonwealth Wrestling Championship, gold at 2017 Asian Wrestling Championships and recently a bronze at the 2018 Asian Wrestling Championships. Like Sakshi, Bajrang too won a silver (in 61kg weight class) in the 2014 CWG and is likely to go a step higher this time.

SUSHIL KUMAR

Double Olympic-medallist Sushil Kumar would aim for a golden hat-trick. Sushil claimed the top position in the previous two editions. Pehelwaan ji, as Sushil is called by his mates at the Chhatrasal Akhada, would be competing in the 74kg freestyle category. After missing the Rio Olympics on a controversial note, Sushil returned to the mat just last year. He won gold at the Nationals when three wrestlers forfeited their match. Then his followers allegedly assaulted fellow grappler Parveen Rana during the selection trials for CWG, earlier this year. The build-up has been far from ideal for the 34-year-old. But Sushil has experience on his side and CWG generally has a relatively weaker level of competition. The gold he won at the 2017 Commonwealth Wrestling Championship is a prime example of that. Therefore, another gold is very much in sight.


WEIGHTLIFTING

MIRABAI CHANU

She won a silver in the 2014 Commonwealth Games and four years down the line, the lifter from Manipur would be keen to improve her standing in Gold Coast. In between, the 23-year-old faced both lows as well as highs as she tried to establish herself as the top woman lifter of the country. She had a disappointing show in Rio when she failed to failed to register any weight against her name. But she bounced back in style by claiming the gold in the World Championship in USA last year, with a world record to boot.

SANJITA CHANU

Mirabai’s statemate Sanjita was the better of the two when the duo fought for the gold medal in the Glasgow Games. But there won’t be any contest between the two in Gold Coast this time as Sanjita has since changed her weight category from 48 kg to 53 kg, while Mirabai has remained in 48kg. The 24-year-old, who took to the sport after getting inspired by the legendary N Kunjurani Devi, made it to the Gold Coast CWG by winning Commonwealth Championships held last year at the same venue.

The actual stars of CWG 2018

India’s top stars in each discipline at the Commonwealth Games, April 17, 2018: The Times of India


ATHLETICS

NEERAJ CHOPRA (gold, men’s javelin throw)

The former World U-20 champion won his first medal and clearly looks good for more in future. Sharpening his skills under the watchful eyes of German Uwe Hohn, Chopra showed supreme confidence in his debut Games to pip the field by a distance.

Other key performers: Seema Punia (silver, women’s discus), Navjeet Dhillon (bronze, women’s discus).

BADMINTON

SAINA NEHWAL (gold, women’s singles) How can Saina lose to a young Sindhu? She asked the questions and found the answers. The new-look Saina looks leaner, is tough to beat at net, and is fitter, thanks to her new physio Christopher.

Other key performers: Srikanth Kidambi (silver, men’s singles)

BOXING

Vikas Krishan (gold, men’s 75kg)

Battling back after a brief bout of illness, the southpaw went from strength to strength and mostly won unanimous verdicts. However, the pressure of winning a bout in just three rounds is getting to Vikas and he is now thinking of going pro.

Other key performers: MC Mary Kom (gold, women’s 45-48kg)

SHOOTING

TEJASWINI SAWANT (gold, women’s 50m rifle prone)

It has been a long time since former world champion Tejaswini Sawant grabbed headlines. She may be competing with rivals 17 years younger, but now she wants to keep going till the Tokyo Olympics.

Other key performers: Heena Sidhu (gold, women’s 25m pistol), Manu Bhaker (gold, women’s 10m air pistol), Anish (gold, men’s 25m rapid fire pistol).

TABLE TENNIS

MANIKA BATRA (gold, women’s singles)

Manika Batra loves to face challenges. In the women’s singles her first challenge came from the World No. 4 and she swatted that aside with ease. She was up against another Singaporean in the final, who ran up a big lead in the first game. Again Manika turned on the after-burners and soon the gold medal was on her neck.

Other key performers: Achanta Sharath Kamal (bronze, men’s singles)

WEIGHTLIFTING

MIRABAI CHANU (gold, women’s 48kg)

It was Mirabai who triggered India’s gold rush at the Games. Chanu set the first Games record in Gold Coast and got a special award from the official timekeepers – a sparkling new watch. From there on it was mostly good times for the Indian lifters at the Carrara Sports Arena.

WRESTLING

SUSHIL KUMAR (gold, men’s freestyle 74kg)

There was controversy during the last Nationals when Sushil Kumar’s rivals gave him walkovers. The CWG rivals should have also considered the same as Sushil walloped one after the another in no time. The final was the best. It lasted all of 80 seconds.

Other key performers: Vinesh Phogat (gold, women’s freestyle 50kg)

India's results, day-wise

5 April

April 6, 2018: The Times of India


WEIGHTLIFTING Gold: Women (48kg): S Mirabai Chanu.

Silver: Men (56kg): P Gururaja.


BADMINTON: Mixed team event: India bt Sri Lanka 5-0; bt Pakistan 5-0.

BOXING: Round 1: Manoj Kumar (69kg) bt Osita Umeh (Nig), enters prequarters.

CYCLING: Men: 7th in Team sprint; Women: 6th in Team sprint.

HOCKEY: Women: India lost to Wales 2-3.

SWIMMING: Men: 50m butterfly: Veerdhawal Khade (finishes 15th after making the semifinals); Sajan Prakash failed to qualify for semifinals; 100m backstroke: Sri Hari Nataraj (finishes 13th after making semifinals).

SQUASH: Men: Singles (Round 1): Harinder Pal Sandhu bt Cameron Stafford (Cayman) 3-1; Vikram Malhotra bt Manda Chilambwe (Zam) 3-0; Sourav Ghosal lost to Chris Binnie (Jam) 2-3.

Women: Dipika Pallikal bt Charlotte Knaggs (TTO) 3-0; Joshna Chinnappa bt Lynette Vai (PNG) 3-0.

TABLE TENNIS: Men’s team event: India bt Northern Ireland 3-0; bt Trinidad and Tobago 3-0.

Women’s team event: India bt Sri Lanka 3-0; bt Wales 3-1.

6 April

Sanjita Adds Second Gold; Lather Lifts Bronze

The day’s results

Biju BabuCyriac, Manipur’s Sanjita Adds Second Gold To Tally; Young Lather Lifts Bronze, April 7, 2018: The Times of India

Weightlifting is not that simple as these super humans make it look on television. Ask Sanjita Chanu, winner of India’s second gold at the Games here. After convincing her mother to take up the sport while in Class IX, Sanjita thought of quitting the sport many times as she toiled day in and day out at national camps. Success was to take its own sweet time.

Four years after winning the gold in the Glasgow edition – and battling a back injury in the intervening period – Sanjita emerged on top of the women’s 53kg competition on Friday. In Glasgow, she won in 48 kg but then the injury forced her to move up the scales and on Friday, it was to prove a boon as it spelt trouble for the defending champion, who is a lifting legend in her own right. Loa Dika Toua of Papua New Guinea – the first woman ever to lift weights at the Olympics when it was introduced for women at the 2000 Sydney Games – was in no mood to relinquish her Glasgow 2014 crown, but at 33 years it would prove too much against a Manipur girl nearly a decade younger, and she could only emerge second best.

Sanjita opened with a snatch of 81 kg and later improved that to 84kg, a new Games record, on her third lift even as Toua failed on her third attempt with two kilos less on the bar. The story was repeated in clean and jerk, as Chanu opened with a 104 kg against Toua’s 102 and improved it to 108. Her rival now went all out looking to lift 109 and then 113, but she failed on both the occasions.

Chanu now had the gold in her bag but in her sights were two more Games records — 111 kg in and 193 set by Toua in 2014. The Indian went for it asking the weight to be hiked to 112 kg but ambition got the better of her and she couldn’t hold on to her lift.

“The bar fell off. My push wasn’t good enough so it didn’t work,” Sanjita told TOI a bit disappointed at not being able to putting her name in all three places in the Games record books. “My fight was against Loa who had won the gold last time in 53kg. So I’m happy that I won the gold beating her. But last year at the Commonwealth Championships here I had lifted three kilos more,” she added.

Despite the thumping show, Sanjita was still not sure how her career would pan out. “I’m 24 now but I don’t think I can go on for another 5, 6 years. Once, I get an injury then it is really tough and that’s a constant worry. We are repeatedly lifting weights during training and so there is every chance of getting injured. Sometimes it could be your back, or else it could be your elbow. Many times, we train ignoring the pain. And once you are injured then you can’t do any more training and that’s it,” Sanjita said.

Sanjita’s fears gained further validation with the ongoing impasse over physio’s availability for Indian lifter at Gold Coast. “And here, we don’t even get the help of our physio as he is not allowed to come near us,” the champion said.

Sanjita, who works as a senior TTE in the Railways, said it has been quite a journey from a remote village in Manipur. “My family was poor so we couldn’t even afford a TV. But after the gold in Glasgow, I got cash awards and with that I bought a piece of land in Imphal city and now I want to build a house there,” she said. “There is lot of crime in our village and so I moved to the city and was living on rent. But it used to be tough when my family members visited me. And that’s why I want my own house,” Sanjita said.

Former diver Deepak wins bronze

There was a bronze for India in the men’s 69kg, with 18-year-old Deepak Lather becoming the youngest Indian to win a lifting medal at the Games. It was an event that saw exciting action with Samoan Vaipava Ioane threatening to snatch the gold till his last lift.

Twice the Samoan came close but it was not good enough. Gareth Evans of Wales won the gold with a total of 299 kg (136 +163). Indika Mudiyanselage of Sri Lanka took the silver at 297 (137 +160) and Lather the bronze at 295 (136 +159).

“I came here determined to win a medal and I’ve done that,” the 18-year-old from Shadipur village in Haryana said. Asked about his failed last attempts, he said: “I gave my 100 per cent but I couldn’t finish it.” The youngster was in pain after hurting his knee as he tried to lift 162 kilos but there was no physio to help him.

7 April

After the iron ladies — the Chanus of Manipur — on the first two days, it was the turn of the Indian ironmen to set pulses racing at the weightlifting arena here on Saturday.

Two Railways employees, Sathish Kumar Sivalingam (men’s 77kg) and Venkat Rahul Ragala (men’s 85kg), showed great skills and temperament to win a gold medal each. They defied pain — Sathish had a thigh niggle while Venkat had knee issues — and lack of deserved support to swell India’s tally to four gold medals on Day 3 of the Games.

Both champions come from Tier II cities — Sivalingam from Vellore and Venkat from Guntur — and from a family of weightlifters. Sathish’s father Sivalingam and Venkat’s dad R Madhu competed at the national level and inspired their kids to better their efforts. Venkat’s younger brother Varun is also a national junior weightlifter.

“I started lifting weights at the age of eight,” the 21-year-old Venkat said after beating Don Opeloge of Samoa in a tense battle for gold. Both the players were level on 151kg after the snatch and the face-off came in clean and jerk. Venkat began with a 182 and then improved it to 187 but failed at 191.

The Samoan started with a good lift of 180 and then went after the gold trying to lift 188kg. Rather than attempting to clear 188 again, he went for broke raising the bar to 191 but he came a cropper. Had he managed to lift 188 he could have bagged the gold. In third place, was Malaysia’s Muhamad Mohdad 328 (145+183).

“I was troubled by a knee injury for the last three months. It troubled me even today,” said Venkat who wore a locket of his mother as inspiration. “She passed away a few years back. Now, I wear the locket on my bicep when I do the snatch and on my forehead during clean and jerk,” he said.

Venkat also proudly flaunts the tattoos of his father and mother on his chest.

“This is the most important medal of my career. Now I want to better this show and win a medal at the Asian Games,” he said.

Sathish breaks pain barrier

For the last few months, Sathish was down with a back injury which began to trouble him more after the weightlifting team landed in Gold Coast.

“I suffered a lot of injuries after the last Games where I won the gold. At the 2015 Worlds, I got injured after the first lift and the doctors ruled me out of the competition. Normally, I start from 144 in snatch but because of the injury I did only 136 in my first lift here. In clean and jerk I had done 172,” said Sathish who won with a total of 317 kg (144+173).

Two weeks back, his injury worsened and Sathish was finding it difficult to even stand. Luckily for the lifter he had the support of GoSport, an NGO based out of Bengaluru. He went through an injury management programme with the help of Varun Shetty who specially flew down to treat Sathish. “I will definitely give credit to my physios and to my coaches who believed in me. I went in with zero confidence as I could not even do squats for the last three months,” Sathish told.

The day's result

April 8, 2018: The Times of India


WEIGHTLIFTING

Gold: Men (77kg) Sathish Sivalingam (Snatch: 136, 140, 144. Clean & jerk: 169,

173. Total: 317kg). Men (85kg) Venkat Rahul Ragala (Snatch: 147, 151 (failed attempt), 151. Clean & jerk: 182, 187, 191 (failed). Total: 338kg). Fifth: Women (63 kg) Vandana Gupta.

BADMINTON

Mixed team event (quarterfinals): India bt Mauritius 3-0 (Satwik Rankireddy/Chirag C Shetty bt Aatish Lubah/ Christopher Paul 21-12, 21-3. Ashwini Ponnappa/ Sikki Reddy bt Aurelie Allet/Nicki Chan-Lam 21-8, 21-7. Kidambi Srikanth bt Georges Paul 21-12, 21-14.)

HOCKEY

Men: India 2 (Dilpreet Singh 13, Harmanpreet Singh 20) drew with Pakistan 2 (Muhammad Irfan Jr 39, Ali Mubashar 60+).

TABLE TENNIS

Team event (QFs): Women: India bt Malaysia 3-0 (Manika Batra bt Ying Ho 11-9, 11-7, 11-7; Madhurika Patkar bt Karen Lyne 7-11, 11-9, 11-9, 11-3; Mouma Das/Madhurika bt Ai Xin Tee/Ying Ho 11-8, 10-12, 11-8, 11-7.

Men: India bt Malaysia 3-0 (Harmeet Desai bt Chee Feng Leong 11-4, 12-10, 11-6. Sharath Achanta Kamal bt Md Ashraf Rizal 11-8, 11-7, 11-6. G Sathiyan/ Harmeet bt Javen Choong/ Chee Feng Leong 11-7, 11-6, 11-7.

BOXING

(Round of 16): Women’s 60kg: Sarita Devi bt Kimberly Gittens (Barbados). Men: 56kg: Hussamuddin Mohammed bt Boe Warawara (Vanuatu). 69kg: Manoj Kumar bt Kassim Mbundwike (Tanzania).

ARTISTIC GYMNASTICS

Individual all-around final: Men: Yogeshwar (14th). Women: Aruna Budda Reddy (14th); Pranati Das (16th).

SWIMMING

Men 50m backstroke (semifinal): Srihari Nataraj (fifth). Finished ninth overall and is first reserve for final.

200m butterfly (final): Sajan Prakash (eighth).

BASKETBALL

Men: England 100 (Adam Thoseby 20, Jamell Anderson 14, Kofi Josephs

14) bt India 54 (Aravind Annadurai 22, Amjyot Singh 10). Women: Malaysia 85 (Fook Yee Yap 18, Magdelene Low 14, Yaakob Nur Izzati 13) bt India 72 (Jeena Skaria 19, Shireen Limaye 11).

CYCLING

Men: 15km scratch race qualifying: Manjeet Singh (13th). Sprint qualifying: Sanuraj Sanandaraj (20th), Ranjit Singh (21st), Sahil Kumar (22nd).

SQUASH

Women: Singles classic plate quarterfinal: Samantha Cornett bt Dipika Pallikal via walkover.

LAWN BOWLS

Women (quarterfinals): India lost to Malta 11-13. Men: Pairs sectional play: India lost to Norfolk Island 7-17.

India's scheduled key events

Biju BabuCyriac, April 8, 2018: The Times of India


ARTISTIC GYMNASTICS

Women’s Vault Final (10:57 am) Men’s Rings Final (12:16 pm)

ATHLETICS

Men’s 20km Race Walk Final (2: 30 am) Women’s 20km Race Walk Final (4:45 am)

BADMINTON

Mixed Team semis: India vs Singapore (6:31 am)

BOXING

Women’s 45-48kg Quarterfinal 2: MC Mary Kom vs Megan Gordon (7:47 am) Men’s 75kg Round of 16: Vikas Krishan vs Campbell Somerville (9:32 am) Women’s 69kg Quarterfinal 3: Lovlina Borgohain vs Sandy Ryan (2:32 pm)

HOCKEY

Women Pool A: India vs England (5:00 am) Men Pool B: India vs Wales (3:00 pm)

SHOOTING

Men’s 10m Air Rifle Finals (9:00 am)

TABLE TENNIS

Women’s Team Semifinal 2: India vs England

WEIGHTLIFTING

Women’s 69kg Final (5:00 am) Men’s 94kg Final (9:30 am) Women’s 75kg Final (2:00 pm)

8 April

April 9, 2018: The Times of India


8 April- India won 3 gold, 1 silver and 2 bronze medals
From: April 9,2018: The Times of India


WEIGHTLIFTING

Gold: Women (69kg): Punam Yadav (Snatch: 95, 98, 100. Clean & jerk: 118, 122 (failed attempt), 122. Total: 222 kg).

Bronze: Men (94kg): Vikas Thakur (Snatch: 152, 154 (failed), 157 (failed). Clean & jerk: 192, 200 (failed), 200 (failed). Total: 351 kg). Women (75kg): Seema (sixth)

SHOOTING

Gold: Women’s 10m air pistol: Manu Bhaker (240.9, CWG record) Silver: Women’s 10m air pistol: Heena Sidhu (234) Bronze: Men’s 10m air rifle: Ravi Kumar (224.1) Women’s skeet final: Saniya Sheikh (fourth). Men’s skeet (qualification): Sheeraz Sheikh (seventh, DNQ)

TABLE TENNIS

Gold: Women’s team event: Final: India bt Singapore 3-1 (Manika Batra bt Tianwei Feng 11-8, 8-11, 7-11, 11-9, 11-7; Madhurika Patkar lost to Mengyu Yu 11-13, 2-11, 6-11; Mouma Das/Madhurika bt Yihan Zhou/Mengyu 11-7, 11-6, 8-11, 11-7; Manika bt Yihan 11-7, 11-4, 11-7).

Semifinal: India bt England 3-0 (Manika bt Kelly Sibley 9-11, 11-7, 11-5, 11-7; Madhurika bt Tin-Tin Ho 11-7, 13-11, 10-12, 11-8; Mouma/Madhurika bt Maria Tsaptsinos/Kelly 11-7, 8-11, 11-7, 11-1).

BADMINTON

Mixed team semifinal: India bt Singapore 3-1 (Satwik Rankireddy/ Ashwini Ponnappa bt Yong Kai Hee/Jia Ying Wong 22-20, 21-18; Kidambi Srikanth bt Kean Yew Loh 21-17, 21-14; Satwik/Chirag C Shetty lost to Yong/Danny Chrisnanta 21-17, 19-21, 12-21; Saina Nehwal bt Jai Min Yeo 21-8, 21-15.

BOXING

Women (quarterfinals): 45-48kg: Mary Kom bt Megan Gordon (Sco). 69kg: Lovlina Borgohain lost to Sandy Ryan (Eng). Men (Round of 16): (75kg) Vikas Krishan bt Campbell Somerville (Aus)

HOCKEY

Men (Pool B): India 4 (Dilpreet Singh 16, Mandeep Singh 28, Harmanpreet Singh 57, SV Sunil 59) bt Wales (Gareth Furlong 17, 45, 58).

Women (Pool A): India 2 (Navneet Kaur 42, Gurjit Kaur 48) bt England 1 (Alexandra Danson 1)

ATHLETICS

20km race walk final: Men: Manish Singh (1:22:22, sixth), KT Irfan (1:27:34, 13th). Women: Khushbir Kaur (1:39:21, fourth), Soumya Baby (DQ) Men’s 400m (heats): Muhammed Anas (45.96, qualified for semis) Men’s shotput (qualifiers): Tejinder Singh (17.20m, qualified for final)

ARTISTIC GYMNASTICS

Women’s vault final: Pranati Nayak (eighth) Men’s rings final: Rakesh Patra (eighth)

BASKETBALL

Women: India 55 (Madhu Kumari 14) lost to New Zealand 90 (Micaela Cocks 21). Men: India 81 (Aravind Annadurai 27, Amjyot Singh

26) lost to Scotland 96 (Nicholas Collins 16)

SQUASH

Women’s singles quarterfinal: Joshna Chinappa lost to Joelle King (NZ) 5-11, 6-11, 9-11.

9 April

April 10, 2018: The Times of India

India’s results on 9 April 2018
From: April 10, 2018: The Times of India

SHOOTING

Gold: Men’s 10m air pistol: Jitu Rai (235.1, CWG record) Silver: Women’s 10m air rifle: Mehuli Ghosh (247.2 CWG record, 9.9 shoot-off) Bronze: 10m air pistol: Om Mitharval (214.3). Women’s 10m air rifle: Apurvi Chandela (225.3) Men’s skeet final: Smit Singh (sixth). Qualification: Sheeraz Sheikh (10th).

BADMINTON

Gold: Mixed team final: India bt Malaysia 3-1 (Satwik Rankireddy/ Ashwini Ponnappa bt Chang Peng Soon/Goh Liu Ying 21-14, 15-21, 21-15; Kidambi Srikanth bt Lee Chong Wei 21-17, 21-14; Satwik/Chirag C Shetty lost to Goh V Shem/Tan Wee Kiong 15-21, 20-22; Saina Nehwal bt Soniia Cheah 21-11, 19-21, 21-9).

TABLE TENNIS

Gold: Men’s team final: India bt Nigeria 3-0 (Sharath Achanta Kamal bt Bode Abiodun 4-11, 11-5, 11-4, 11-9. G Sathiyan bt Segun Toriola 10-12, 11-3, 11-3, 11-4. Sathiyan/ Harmeet Desai bt Olajide Omotayo/Bode 11-8, 11-5, 11-3).

Semifinal: India bt Singapore 3-2 (Harmeet lost to Gao Ning 9-11, 5-11, 8-11. Sharath bt Poh Shao Feng 11-5, 11-5, 11-4. Sathiyan/Harmeet bt Pang Xue Jie/Poh 8-11, 11-7, 11-9, 11-8. Sathiyan lost to Gao 5-11, 12-10, 4-11, 11-13. Sharath bt Pang 11-5, 12-10, 12-10).

WEIGHTLIFTING

Silver: Men (105kg): Pardeep Singh (Snatch: 148 (Failed attempt), 148,

152. Clean & jerk: 200, 209 (failed), 211 (failed). Total: 352kg). +105kg: Gurdeep Singh (382kg, fourth).

Women: 90kg: Lalchhanhimi (194kg, eighth). +90kg: Purnima Pandey (212kg, sixth).

BOXING

Men (round of 16): 52kg: Gaurav Solanki bt Akimos Ampiah (GHA). 60kg: Manish Kaushik bt Michael Alexander (TTO).

ATHLETICS

Men’s high jump (qualifying): Tejaswin Shankar (2.21m, qualified for final).

Men’s 400m semis: Muhammad Anas (45.44, qualified for final) Women’s 400m (heats): Hima Das (52.11, qualified for semis), MR Poovamma

(53.72, DNQ) Women’s 10,000m final: L Suriya (32:23.56, 13th) Men’s shot put final: Tejinder Singh (19.42, 8th)

LAWN BOWLS

Men’s singles: Round 2: Robert Paxton (Eng) bt Krishna Xalxo 21-19: Rd 1: Krishna Xalxo bt Cephas Kimani (Ken) 21-12.

Men’s fours (Rd 1): India bt South Africa 19-7 Women’s pairs (Rd 1): Wales bt India 16-20 Women’s triples (Rd 2): India bt Papua New Guinea 24-6. Rd 1: Fiji bt India 23-15.

SWIMMING

Men’s 200m backstroke (heats): Srihari Nataraj (2:04.75, DNQ)

10 April

April 11, 2018: The Times of India

Achievements of Indian players in CWG 2018 on 10 April, 2018
From: April 11, 2018: The Times of India

SHOOTING

Gold: Women’s 25m pistol final: Heena Sidhu (38, CWG record). Annu Singh (15, sixth) 50m rifle prone men’s final: Chain Singh (204.8, fourth). Gagan Narang (142.3, seventh).

PARA POWERLIFTING

Bronze: Men’s heavyweight final: Sachin Chaudhary (201 (failed attempt), 201 (failed), 201. Total: 181kg) Men’s lightweight final: Farman Basha (169.4kg, fifth) Women’s lightweight final: Sakina Khatun (93.2kg, fifth)

BOXING

Quarterfinals: Men: 46-49kg: Amit Panghal bt Aqeel Ahmed (Sco). 56kg: Hussamuddin Mohammed bt Everisto Mulenga (Zam). 69kg: Manoj Kumar bt Terry Nickolas (Aus). 91kg: Naman Tanwar bt Frank Masoe (Sam). +91kg: Satish Kumar bt Nigel Paul (Tto).

HOCKEY

Men: India 2 (Harmanpreet Singh 3, 44) bt Malaysia 1 (Faizal Saari 16). Women: India 1 (Rani 47) bt South Africa 0.

ATHLETICS

Men’s 400m final: Muhammad Anas (45.31, NR, fourth) Men’s 400m hurdles (heats): Ayyasamy Dharun (49.85, DNQ) Women’s 400m Semifinal: Hima Das (51.53, third; qualified for final as one of two fastest losers)

BADMINTON

Mixed doubles (round of 64): Satwik Rankireddy/ Ashwini Ponnappa bt Stuart Hardy/Chloe Le Tissier (Ggy) 21-9, 21-5.

SQUASH

Doubles (pool round): Women: Joshna Chinappa/ Dipika Pallikal bt Faiza Zafar/Madina Zafar (Pak) 10-11, 11-0, 11-1. Mixed: Dipika/Saurav Ghosal bt Mary Fung-a-fat/Jason-Ray Khalil (Guy) 11-3, 11-3. Dipika/Saurav bt Madina/ Tayyab Aslam (Pak) 11-2, 11-3. Joshna/Harinder Pal Sandhu bt Caroline Laing/ Jacob Kelly (Cay) 11-3, 11-6.

LAWN BOWLS

Men’s singles: Round 4: Andrew Newell (Jam) bt Krishna Xalxo 21-18. Rd 3: Krishna Xalxo bt Arun Kumar (Fij) 21-11. Men’s fours (Rd 2): India bt Botswana 16-9. Women’s pairs: Round 3: N.Ireland bt India 15-14. Rd 2: India bt Jersey 22-12. Women’s triples: Rd 3: Australia bt India 20-12

SWIMMING

Men’s 1500m freestyle final: Sajan Prakash (15:52.84, seventh). Women’s S8 50m freestyle (heats): Vaishnavi Jagtap (41.63, sixth) TABLE TENNIS Women’s TT6-10 singles: Vaishnavi Sutar lost to Stephanie Chan (Can) 1-11, 2-11, 3-11. Maitreyee Sarkar lost to Melissa Tapper (Aus) 3-11, 1-11, 3-11.

11 April

Achievements of Indian players in CWG 2018 on April 11, 2018
From: April 12, 2018: The Times of India

See graphic:

Achievements of Indian players in CWG 2018 on April 11, 2018

12 April

April 13, 2018: The Times of India


Achievements, Indian players on April 12, 2018
From: April 13, 2018: The Times of India


WRESTLING

Gold: Men’s 74kg freestyle (final): Sushil Kumar bt Johannes Botha (RSA) by technical superiority.

Gold: Men’s 57kg freestyle (final): Rahul Aware bt Steven Takahashi (Can) 15-7. Silver: Women’s 53kg freestyle (final): Babita Kumari lost to Diana Weicker (Can) 2-5.

Bronze: Women’s 76kg freestyle (third-place): Kiran bt Katouskia Pariadhaven (MRI) by fall.

SHOOTING

Silver: Women’s 50m rifle prone: Tejaswini Sawant (618.9).

ATHLETICS

Silver: Women’s discus throw: Seema Punia (60.41m).

Bronze: Navjeet Dhillon(57.43m).

Men’s triple jump (qualifiers): Arpinder Singh (16.39m), AV Rakesh Babu (15.98m). Both qualify for final.

Women’s long jump final: Neena Nellickal V (6.19m, 10th), Nayana James (6.14m, 12th).

BADMINTON

Round of 16: Men: Singles: Kidambi Srikanth bt Niluka Karunaratne (SL) 21-10, 21-10; HS Prannoy bt Anthony Joe (Aus) 21-18, 21-11; Doubles: Satwik Rankireddy/ Chirag C Shetty bt Aatish Lubah/ Christopher Jean Paul (MRI) 21-8, 21-12.

Women: Singles: PV Sindhu bt Hsuan-Yu Wendy Chen (Aus) 21-15, 21-9; Ruthvika Gadde bt Jia Min Yeo (SGP) 21-10, 21-23, 21-10; Saina Nehwal bt Jessica Li (IOM) 21-4, 2-0 (retd.); Doubles: Ashwini Ponnappa/ N Sikki Reddy bt Ren-Ne Ong/ Jia Ying Crystal Wong (SGP) 21-18, 21-13; Mixed doubles: Pranav Chopra/ N Sikki Reddy bt Danny Bawa Chrisnanta/ Jia Ying Crystal Wong (SGP) 21-19, 21-13; Satwik Rankireddy/ Ashwini Ponnappa bt Kristen Tsai/ Nyl Yakura (Can) 21-10, 21-7.

HOCKEY

Women’s semifinal: Australia 1 (Grace Stewart 37) bt India 0.

SQUASH

Mixed doubles (Quarters): Dipika Pallikal/ Saurav Ghosal bt Tesni Evans/ Peter Creed (Wal) 11-8, 11-10; Joelle King/ Paul Coll bt Joshna Chinappa/ Harinder Pal Sandhu 11-10, 11-10. Round of 16: Joshna/ Harinder bt Amanda Landers-Murphy/ Zac Millar (NZ) 11-7, 10-11, 11-5; Dipika/ Ghosal bt Aifa Azman/ Sanjay Singh Chal (Mas) 7-11, 11-6, 11-8. Men’s doubles: Round of 16: Vikram Malhotra/ Ramit Tandon bt Chrish Binnie/ Lewis Walters 11-4, 11-10.

13 April

April 14, 2018: The Times of India

Achievements, Indian players on April 13, 2018
From: April 14, 2018: The Times of India


SHOOTING

Gold: Men’s 25m rapid fire pistol: Anish Bhanwala. Neeraj Kumar (fifth).

Gold: Women’s 50m rifle 3 position: Tejaswini Sawant.

Silver: Anjum Moudgil.

Women’s trap: Shreyasi Singh (fifth).

WRESTLING

Gold: Men’s 65kg: Bajrang bt Kane Charig (Wal) 10-0.

Silver: Mausam Khatri lost to Martin Erasmus (RSA) 2-12.

Silver: Women’s 57kg: Pooja Dhanda lost to Odunayo Adekuoroye (NGR) 5-7.

Bronze: Women’s 68kg: Divya Kakran bt Sherin Sultana (Ban) 4-0.

BOXING

Bronze: 56kg: Mohammed Hussamuddin lost to Peter McGrail (Eng) 0-5.

Bronze: 69kg: Manoj Kumar lost to Pat McCormack (Eng) 0-5.

Bronze: 91kg: Naman Tanwar lost to Jason Whateley (Aus) 0-4.

All semifinals: Men: 46-49kg: Amit bt Juma Miiro (Uga) 5-0; 52kg: Gaurav Solanki bt Bandara Ishan Vidanalange (SL) 4-0; 60kg: Manish Kaushik bt James McGivern (NIR) 4-1; 75kg: Vikas Krishan bt Steven Donnelly (NIR) 5-0; 91kg: Satish Kumar bt Agnes Keddy (Sey).

TABLE TENNIS

Silver: Tianwei Feng/ Mengyu Yu bt Manika Batra/ Mouma Das 11-5, 11-4, 11-5. Bronze medal playoff: Ying Ho/ Karen Lyne (Mas) bt Pooja Sahasrabudhe/ Sutritha Mukherjee 15-13, 11-7, 8-11, 11-7. ATHLETICS

Men: Javelin: Neeraj Chopra (80.42m), Vipin Kashana (78.88m). Both qualify for finals; 1500m: Jinson Johnson (3:47.04, qualifies for final); 4x400m: India (3:04.05, qualify for final).

HOCKEY

Men’s semifinal: NZ 3 (Hugo Inglis 7, Stephen Jenness 13, Marcus Child 40) bt India 2 (Harmanpreet Singh 30 & 56).


14 April

April 15, 2018: The Times of India

Achievements, Indian players on April 14, 2018
From: April 15, 2018: The Times of India


BOXING

Gold: Men: 52kg: Gaurav Solanki bt Brendan Irvine (Nir).

75kg: Vikas Krishan bt Dieudonne Ntsengue (Cmr).

Gold: Women (45-48kg): MC Mary Kom bt Kristina O’Hara (Nir).

Silver: 46-49kg: Amit Phangal lost to Galal Yafai (Eng).

60kg: Manish Kaushik lost to Harry Garside (Aus).

+91kg: Satish Kumar lost to Frazer Clarke (Eng)

SHOOTING

Gold: Men’s 50m rifle 3 positions: Sanjeev Rajput (454.5, CWG record). Chain Singh (419.1, 5th).

Men’s trap (qualifiers): Kynan Chenai (117+3, DNQ), Manavjit Sandhu (115, DNQ)

TABLE TENNIS

Gold: Women’s singles: Manika Batra bt Mengyu Yu 11-7, 11-6, 11-2, 11-7;

Silver: Men’s doubles: Sharath Achanta Kamal/G Sathiyan lost to Paul Drinkhall/Liam Pitchford (Eng) 5-11, 12-10, 11-9, 6-11, 8-11.

Bronze: Men’s doubles: Harmeet Desai/Sanil Shetty bt Shao Poh/Koen Pang (Sgp) 11-5, 11-6, 12-10.

Semis: Mixed doubles: Sharath/ Mouma Das lost to Gao Ning/ Yu Mengyu (Sgp) 2-3. Sathiyan/ Manika lost to Liam Pitchford/ Tin-Tin Ho 2-3. Singles: Sharath lost to Aruna Quadri (Ngr) 0-4.

WRESTLING

Gold: Vinesh Phogat (50kg freestyle), Sumit Malik (125kg freestyle).

Bronze: Sakshi Malik (62kg freestyle). Somveer (86kg freestyle)

ATHLETICS

Gold: Men’s javelin throw: Neeraj Chopra (86.47m). Vipin Kashana (77.87, 4th)

Men’s triple jump final: Arpinder Singh (16.46, 4th)

Men’s 1500m final: Jinson Johnson (3:37.86, 5th)

4x400m final: Women: India (3:33.61, 7th). Men: India (DNF)

SQUASH

Silver: Mixed doubles: Dipika Pallikal/Saurav Ghosal lost to Donna Urquhart/Cameron Pilley (Aus) 8-11, 10-11. Women’s doubles semis: Joshna Chinnappa/Dipika bt Laura Massaro/Sarah-Jane Perry (Eng) 11-10, 11-5.

BADMINTON

Bronze: Women’s doubles: Sikki Reddy/Ashwini Ponnappa bt Setyana Mapasa/Gronya Somerville (Aus) 21-19, 21-19. Bronze playoffs: Rajiv Ouseph (Eng) bt HS Prannoy 21-17, 23-25, 9-21. Chan Peng Soon/Goh Liu Ying (Mas) bt Satwik Rankireddy/ Ashwini 21-19, 21-19.

Semis: Singles: Men: Kidambi Srikanth bt Ouseph 21-10, 21-17. Prannoy lost to Lee Chong Wei (Mas) 16-21, 21-9, 14-21.

Women: Saina Nehwal bt Kirsty Gilmour (Sco) 21-14, 18-21, 21-17. PV Sindhu bt Michelle Li (Can) 18-21, 8-21.

Doubles: Men: Satwik/Chirag C Shetty bt Buwaneka G/Sachin Dias (SL) 21-18, 21-10. Women: Mei Chow/Vivian Hoo (Mas) bt Sikki Reddy/Ashwini 17-21, 21-15, 21-4. Mixed: Satwik/Ashwini lost to Marcus Ellis/Lauren Smith (Eng) 22-20, 18-21, 16-21.

HOCKEY

Bronze medal playoffs: Women: England 6 (Hollie Pearne-Webb 27, Sophie Bray 44, 49, 56, Laura Unsworth 55, Alexandra Danson 57) bt India 0. Men: England 2 (Sam Ward 7, 43) bt India 1 (Varun Kumar 27).

15 April

April 16, 2018: The Times of India


Achievements, Indian players on April 15, 2018
From: April 16, 2018: The Times of India

BOXING

Gold: Men: 52kg: Gaurav Solanki bt Brendan Irvine (Nir). 75kg: Vikas Krishan bt Dieudonne Ntsengue (Cmr). Gold: Women (45-48kg): MC Mary Kom bt Kristina O’Hara (Nir).

Silver: 46-49kg: Amit Phangal lost to Galal Yafai (Eng). 60kg: Manish Kaushik lost to Harry Garside (Aus). +91kg: Satish Kumar lost to Frazer Clarke (Eng)

SHOOTING

Gold: Men’s 50m rifle 3 positions: Sanjeev Rajput

(454.5, CWG record). Chain Singh (419.1, 5th).

Men’s trap (qualifiers): Kynan Chenai (117+3, DNQ), Manavjit Sandhu (115, DNQ)

TABLE TENNIS

Gold: Women’s singles: Manika Batra bt Mengyu Yu 11-7, 11-6, 11-2, 11-7; Silver: Men’s doubles: Sharath Achanta Kamal/G Sathiyan lost to Paul Drinkhall/Liam Pitchford (Eng) 5-11, 12-10, 11-9, 6-11, 8-11. Bronze: Men’s doubles: Harmeet Desai/Sanil Shetty bt Shao Poh/Koen Pang (Sgp) 11-5, 11-6, 12-10.

Semis: Mixed doubles: Sharath/ Mouma Das lost to Gao Ning/ Yu Mengyu (Sgp) 2-3. Sathiyan/ Manika lost to Liam Pitchford/ Tin-Tin Ho 2-3. Singles: Sharath lost to Aruna Quadri (Ngr) 0-4.

WRESTLING

Gold: Vinesh Phogat (50kg freestyle), Sumit Malik (125kg freestyle). Bronze: Sakshi Malik (62kg freestyle). Somveer (86kg freestyle)

ATHLETICS

Gold: Men’s javelin throw: Neeraj Chopra (86.47m). Vipin Kashana (77.87, 4th) Men’s triple jump final: Arpinder Singh (16.46, 4th) Men’s 1500m final: Jinson Johnson (3:37.86, 5th) 4x400m final: Women: India (3:33.61, 7th). Men: India (DNF)

SQUASH

Silver: Mixed doubles: Dipika Pallikal/Saurav Ghosal lost to Donna Urquhart/Cameron Pilley (Aus) 8-11, 10-11.

Women’s doubles semis: Joshna Chinnappa/Dipika bt Laura Massaro/Sarah-Jane Perry (Eng) 11-10, 11-5.

BADMINTON

Bronze: Women’s doubles: Sikki Reddy/Ashwini Ponnappa bt Setyana Mapasa/Gronya Somerville (Aus) 21-19, 21-19. Bronze playoffs: Rajiv Ouseph (Eng) bt HS Prannoy 21-17, 23-25, 9-21. Chan Peng Soon/Goh Liu Ying (Mas) bt Satwik Rankireddy/ Ashwini 21-19, 21-19.

Semis: Singles: Men: Kidambi Srikanth bt Ouseph 21-10, 21-17. Prannoy lost to Lee Chong Wei (Mas) 16-21, 21-9, 14-21. Women: Saina Nehwal bt Kirsty Gilmour (Sco) 21-14, 18-21, 21-17. PV Sindhu bt Michelle Li (Can) 18-21, 8-21.

Doubles: Men: Satwik/Chirag C Shetty bt Buwaneka G/Sachin Dias (SL) 21-18, 21-10. Women: Mei Chow/Vivian Hoo (Mas) bt Sikki Reddy/Ashwini 17-21, 21-15, 21-4. Mixed: Satwik/Ashwini lost to Marcus Ellis/Lauren Smith (Eng) 22-20, 18-21, 16-21.

HOCKEY

Bronze medal playoffs: Women: England 6 (Hollie Pearne-Webb 27, Sophie Bray 44, 49, 56, Laura Unsworth 55, Alexandra Danson

57) bt India 0. Men: England 2 (Sam Ward 7, 43) bt India 1 (Varun Kumar 27).

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