Hindi-Urdu songs: 1944

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Two notes about the credits

1944 Who sang the song Maiñ in phooloñ ké sañg dolooñ for the film ‚‘Saugandh‘‘? Apparently the liner notes of the Hindustan Records’ album ‘Songs From The New Theatres Films’ say that it was Utpala Sen. According to ‘Geet Kosh’ Vimla is the singer. Normally one should unquestioningly accept what an album’s credits say. However, when a song is reissued sixty years later, credits are not always accurate and ‘Geet Kosh’ normally has a lower margin of error.

1944 Who sang the song Do dilon ko yeh duniya milne nahiñ deti for the film Chand ? An urban legend has it that it was Roshan Ara Begum. However, all authorities, including the jackets of two different Saregama albums, credit Manju with the singing.

The Romanisation of the Urdu ‘q’

1944 Out of copious, but misguided, respect for Urdu/ Arabic, almost every writer on the internet has spelt kãtib in the song ‘Aye kãtib é-taqdeer mujhe’ from the film My Sister (Meri Baheen [sic]) with a ‘q,’ i.e. as qaatib e taqdeer.

Not correct. And if you want to learn some Urdu, here’s why.

Kãtib means ‘he who writes,’ and normally refers to a calligrapher, a writer, a scribe. In Urdu the word is spelt with a kaaf, not with a qaaf. کاتب, कातिब. No dot in the Devanagari version. The word belongs to the same family as kitaab (book), kutub (books), kutub-khãnã (a house of books: library or bookshop), kitãbat (calligraphy) and, above all, kãtib é-taqdeer (the writer of [everyone’s] destiny.’

The word qutub, as in the tower (mînãr), means ‘pole,’ as in the north and south poles. Let us not confuse the two words in an unnecessary effort to be more Urduised than the, well, kãtibs of Urdu.

Incidentally, this film was made in Bengal. In Devanagari its name has been spelt as baheen, rather than behen. The mãtrã of ee is never used while spelling behen.

India’s national song

1944 The book „Hindi Film Song: Music Beyond Boundaries“ informs us (p.213) that “C. Ramachandra composed music for ‘Sãré jahãñ sé achhã’ by Dr. Iqbal” for the film Sukhi Jivan (1942).

However, the Geet Kosh has not included India’s national song among the nine songs listed by it from the film. Nor has it included Dr. Iqbal among those who wrote lyrics for the film. (It has credited Gurudev Tagore with the lyrics of what became India’s national anthem shortly after, but obviously not because, it was included in the film ‚‘Humrahi‘‘ [1945].) If Mr Da Ranade is correct then his information is of national importance. But the closest pointer in the Geet Kosh’s list from „Sukhi Jivan“ is to two versions of a song called ‘Hindustãñ hamãrã, hai hum ko jaañ sé pyãrã.’

Not quite the same as ‘Sãré jahãñ sé achhã’

India’s national song was sung in a 1950 film—and then, over the years, in more films. The first such film was ‚‘Hindustan Hamara‘‘ (1950). The music was by Vasant Desai, while Gulraj led the chorus that sang the song. Dr. Iqbal was obviously credited with the lyrics.

In 1936 a parody of the national song had been sung in director Devaki Bose’ ‚‘Sunehra Sansar.‘‘ Vijay Kumar, B.A.’s lyrics were set to music by K.C. Dey and went, ‘Sãré jahãñ sé achhã sãbun [soap] banã hamãrã, hum kishtiyãñ [boats] haiñ is ki…’’

Thirty significant Hindi-Urdu songs from 1944

Song

Film

Music

Lyrics

Singer(s)

Diya jisne dil

Bhanwara

Khemchand Prakash

Kedar Sharma

K.L. Saigal, Uma Devi 

Hum apna unhéin bana na sake (Raag  Khamãj/ Taal  Keherwã)

Bhanwara

Khemchand Prakash

Kedar Sharma

K.L. Saigal

Kya hum ne bigãdã hai kyun

Bhanwara

Khemchand Prakash

Kedar Sharma

K.L. Saigal, Amir Bai 

Muskurãté hué yooñ ãñkh churãyã karo

Bhanwara

Khemchand Prakash

Kedar Sharma

K.L. Saigal

Thukra rahi hai duniya

Bhanwara

Khemchand Prakash

Kedar Sharma

K.L. Saigal, Uma Devi 

Chanda des piya jaa, saãjan hamré bhûlé hum ko

Bhartruhari

Khemchand Prakash

Pt. Indra

Amirbai Karnataki

Mora dheeré ghoonghat

Bhartruhari

Khemchand Prakash

Pt. Indra

Amîrbai Karnataki

Aayi, aayi, museebat aayi, musafir bhaag chalo

Chand

Husnalal- Bhagatram

Qamar Jalalabadi

Manju

Do dilon ko yeh duniya milne nahiñ deti (Raag Bheem Palãsi)

Chand

Husnalal- Bhagatram

Qamar Jalalabadi

Manju

Badnaam muhabbat kaun karé (Raag Bageshri implied)

Dost

Sajjad Hussain

Shams Lucknowi

Noor Jehan

Koi prem sañdésã, hãyé loot gayã

Dost

Sajjad Hussain

Shams Lucknowi

Noor Jehan

Saanjh ki bela, panchhi akela

Jwar Bhata

Anil Biswas

Narendra Sharma

Aroon Kumar, etc

Badariya baras gayi us paar

Moorti

Bulo C. Rani

Pandit Indra

Mukesh (debut song), Khursheed, Hameeda

Jalã patang to is mein qusoor kiska hai

Mumtaz Mahal @ Mumtaz

Khemchand Prakash

Wali Saheb

Khursheed Bano

Aye kãtib é-taqdeer mujhe (Raag Bhairavi/ Taal Keherwã)

My Sister (Meri Baheen [sic])

Pankaj Kumar Mullick

Pandit Bhushan

K.L.Saigal

Chhupo na chhupo na O pyari sajaniya

My Sister (Meri Baheen [sic])

Pankaj Kumar Mullick

Pandit Bhushan

K.L.Saigal

Do naina matware tihãré (Raag KalyãN/ Taal Keherwã)

My Sister (Meri Baheen [sic])

Pankaj Kumar Mullick

Pandit Bhushan

K.L.Saigal

Duniya mein hoon duniya ka talabgar nahin hooñ

My Sister (Meri Baheen [sic])

Pankaj Kumar Mullick

Pandit Bhushan

K.L.Saigal

Maiñ in phooloñ sañg dolooñ

My Sister (Meri Baheen [sic])

Pankaj Kumar Mullick

Pandit Bhushan

Vimla/ Utpala Sen

Chalé gayé chalé gayé 

Pahele Aap

Naushad

D.N. Madhok

Zohra Bai

Moré saiyañ-jibheji chuñdri, rangoñ meiñ isé pyaar rang daar

Pahele Aap

Naushad

D.N. Madhok

Zohrabai Ambalawali

Aai Diwali aai Diwali, deepak sañg nãché patañga (Raag Bhairavi/ Taal  Dadra)

Rattan   

Naushad

Dina Nath Madhok

Zohrabai Ambalawali

Angdai teri hai bahana, saaf keh do hameiñ ki jaa jaa

Rattan

Naushad

Dina Nath Madhok

Manju

Ankhiyan milãké, jîyã bharmã chalé nahîñ jãnã

Rattan

Naushad

D.N. Madhok

‘Zohra Ambala’ [sic]

Jhoothé hain sab sapné suhane, moorakh man sach jaané

Rattan   

Naushad

Dina Nath Madhok

Manju

Mil bichhad gai akhiyãñ, hãyé Rãmã

Rattan

Naushad

Dina Nath Madhok

Amîrbai Karnataki

Milké bichhad gai ankhiyãñ, hayé

Rattan   

Naushad

Dina Nath Madhok

Amirbai Karnataki

Pardesi bãlam aa bãdal aayé, teré bina kachhu na bhayé

Rattan   

Naushad

Dina Nath Madhok

Zohrabai Ambalawali

Sawan badalo

Rattan   

Naushad

Dina Nath Madhok

Zohrabai Ambalawali,  Karan Dewan

Muhabbat mein sãra jahan jal rahã hai, zameeñ to zameeñ aasmãñ jal rahã hai

Shahenshah Babar

Khemchand Prakash

Munshi Shams

Khursheed

 

How these particular songs were chosen

India’s first—and Hindi-Urdu music’s only durable—hit parade began in 1954. Its creator, Binaca Geet Mala, issued annual lists for 1952 and 1953 as well. However, songs had been introduced in Hindi-Urdu films as early as in 1931, indeed, with India’s first talking film.

Which were the most popular Hindi-Urdu songs between 1931 and 1951? The internationally accepted way of finding out is to go through contemporary as well as later articles to see which songs were mentioned (‘cited’) most often.

Indpaedia’s volunteers spent almost 21 man-months combing through all sources that mentioned songs from the years not covered by Binaca Geet Mala. Around one-third of this time was spent sifting through and analysing fifteen sources that covered the period 1931-53. These included YouTube playlists, three encylopaedias of Hindi-Urdu songs and a scholarly history of Hindi-Urdu film music. Because very few songs were mentioned ‘often,’ the volunteers noted down every song that was mentioned at all. Less than half a dozen songs were omitted because they did not exist either on Saregama’s website, the Geet Kosh, YouTube or Hindi Geet Mala. Every song was cross-checked with at least one of these sites.

For more details please see Hindi-Urdu songs: methodology.

Annual lists for the years 1931-51 have been arranged in the alphabetical order, because no one knows the order of their popularity. However, this can be done.

The Indpaedia community will be grateful if some volunteer(s) check out on YouTube the songs mentioned on this page and rank them according to the number of times each song has been played. (Most, but not all, of these songs are on YouTube.) This contribution will be gratefully acknowledged in the volunteer’s name.

Raags in songs

Few film songs that have a root in Indian classical music remain faithful to a raag throughout their length. Indpaedia volunteers have sometimes mentioned raags even when there is merely a hint of that raag in a song. (‘Raag’ is frequently spelt ‘raga,’ while ‘taal’ is also spelt ‘tal.’)

Wherever a taal has been mentioned, it is the one verified by ChandraKantha.com, and sometimes the raags, too.

See also

For lists of popular songs

If the song that you are looking for has not been listed under one particular year, please look up the next year’s charts as well. This is especially true of Binaca/ Cibaca’s annual charts, which would put songs released in the last months of a year in the following year’s charts.

Hindi-Urdu songs: An introduction <> Hindi-Urdu songs: methodology <> Hindi-Urdu songs: sources and abbreviations <> Hindi-Urdu songs, 1931-49: years not known

Hindi-Urdu songs: 1931 Hindi-Urdu songs: 1932 Hindi-Urdu songs: 1933 Hindi-Urdu songs: 1934

Hindi-Urdu songs: 1935 Hindi-Urdu songs: 1936 Hindi-Urdu songs: 1937 Hindi-Urdu songs: 1938 Hindi-Urdu songs: 1939

Hindi-Urdu songs: 1940 Hindi-Urdu songs: 1941 Hindi-Urdu songs: 1942 Hindi-Urdu songs: 1943 Hindi-Urdu songs: 1944

Hindi-Urdu songs: 1945 Hindi-Urdu songs: 1946 Hindi-Urdu songs: 1947 Hindi-Urdu songs: 1948 Hindi-Urdu songs: 1949

Hindi-Urdu songs: 1950 Hindi-Urdu songs: 1951 Hindi-Urdu songs: 1952 Binaca Geet Mala: History and trivia Binaca Geet Mala 1953: greatest hits Binaca Geet Mala 1954: greatest hits

Binaca Geet Mala 1955: greatest hits Binaca Geet Mala 1956: greatest hits Binaca Geet Mala 1957: greatest hits Binaca Geet Mala 1958: greatest hits Binaca Geet Mala 1959: greatest hits

Binaca Geet Mala 1960: greatest hits Binaca Geet Mala 1961: greatest hits Binaca Geet Mala 1962: greatest hits Binaca Geet Mala 1963: greatest hits Binaca Geet Mala 1964: greatest hits

Binaca Geet Mala 1965: greatest hits Binaca Geet Mala 1966: greatest hits Binaca Geet Mala 1967: greatest hits Binaca Geet Mala 1968: greatest hits Binaca Geet Mala 1969: greatest hits

Binaca Geet Mala 1970: greatest hits Binaca Geet Mala 1971: greatest hits Binaca Geet Mala 1972: greatest hits Binaca Geet Mala 1973: greatest hits Binaca Geet Mala 1974: greatest hits

Binaca Geet Mala 1975: annual list Binaca Geet Mala 1976: annual list Binaca Geet Mala 1977: annual list Binaca Geet Mala 1978: annual list Binaca Geet Mala 1979: annual list

Binaca Geet Mala 1980: annual list Binaca Geet Mala 1981: annual list Binaca Geet Mala 1982: annual list Binaca Geet Mala 1983: annual list Binaca Geet Mala 1984: annual list

Binaca Geet Mala 1985: annual list Cibaca Geet Mala 1986: annual list Cibaca Geet Mala 1987: annual list Cibaca Geet Mala 1988: annual list Cibaca Sangeet Mala 1989: annual list

Cibaca Sangeet Mala 1990: annual list Cibaca Geet Mala 1991: annual list Cibaca Geet Mala 1992: annual list Cibaca Geet Mala 1993: annual list Hindi-Urdu songs: 1994

Hindi-Urdu songs: 1995 Hindi-Urdu songs: 1996 Hindi-Urdu songs: 1997 Hindi-Urdu songs: 1998 Hindi-Urdu songs: 1999

Hindi-Urdu songs: 2000 Hindi-Urdu songs: 2001 Hindi-Urdu songs: 2002 Hindi-Urdu songs: 2003 Hindi-Urdu songs: 2004

Hindi-Urdu songs: 2005 Hindi-Urdu songs: 2006 Hindi-Urdu songs: 2007 Hindi-Urdu songs: 2008 Hindi-Urdu songs: 2009

Hindi-Urdu songs: 2010 Hindi-Urdu songs: 2011 Hindi-Urdu songs: 2012 Hindi-Urdu songs: 2013 Hindi-Urdu songs: 2014

Hindi-Urdu songs: 2015

For lists of popular Hindi-Urdu films

Indpaedia has lists of the highest grossing films of all individual years (and some decades) from Hindi-Urdu films: 1940 to the present.

Records for the 1930s are non-existent but you may still want to read:

Hindi-Urdu films: 1931 <> Hindi-Urdu films: 1932 <> Hindi-Urdu films: 1938 <>Hindi-Urdu films: 1939

Below are sample links, one from each decade. Links to all individual years (and some decades) will be found at the bottom of every page in the Hindi-Urdu films series.

Hindi-Urdu films: 1941 <> Hindi-Urdu films: 1950 <> Hindi-Urdu films: 1968 <> Hindi-Urdu films: 1977 <> Hindi-Urdu films: 1986 <> Hindi-Urdu films: 1995 <> Hindi-Urdu films: 2004 <> Hindi-Urdu films: 2013 <>

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